For Microsoft Kool-Aid Drinkers, Non-paid MS Evangelists written by a Senior Consultant, Passionate about Tech

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I just rolled off a client recently that needed to build a Universal Windows Platform (UWP) application as part of their hardware and software solution.  For those who aren’t yet familiar with UWP, you can check out this article by Tyler Whitney.

As many of you developers out there are aware, sometimes you have to build or bring with you a number of application infrastructure items before you can even get started with the core application logic.  For example, you might need some helpers, services and base classes that make your job easier or allow you to start with your base patterns, such as, MVC, MVVM, etc.

So, I have decided to create a series of posts that build up a bunch of common, important parts of an application that you might want to have in place before you even start developing your core functionality.  I have discussed a number of topics in my previous posts:

Building a Universal Windows Platform (UWP) Application (Part 1) – Using Template10

Building a Universal Windows Platform (UWP) Application (Part 2) – T4 and Strings

Building a Universal Windows Platform (UWP) Application (Part 3) – Multilingual Support

If you haven’t already read the previous posts, I recommend you do since they all build on each other.

Every developer knows the pain of distributing their application to someone who isn’t running it in debug mode in Visual Studio and is having a problem with the software.  “Oh, I haven’t done anything.”, “It used to work!” or “This software just isn’t working.” are common statements that we hear, right?

Today, we are going to discuss how we can add logging support to our application so that we can get better information from a user to help find and fix any issues that they are experiencing.

Read more: https://www.intertech.com/Blog/building-a-universal-windows-platform-uwp-application-part-4-logging-w-metrolog/
Follow us: @IntertechInc on Twitter | Intertech on Facebook


uwp3-560x224

I just rolled off a client recently that needed to build a Universal Windows Platform (UWP) application as part of their hardware and software solution.  For those who aren’t yet familiar with UWP, you can check out this article by Tyler Whitney.

As many of you developers out there are aware, sometimes you have to build or bring with you a number of application infrastructure items before you can even get started with the core application logic.  For example, you might need some helpers, services and base classes that make your job easier or allow you to start with your base patterns, such as, MVC, MVVM, etc.

So, I have decided to create a series of posts that build up a bunch of common, important parts of an application that you might want to have in place before you even start developing your core functionality.  I have discussed a number of topics in my previous posts:

Building a Universal Windows Platform (UWP) Application (Part 1) – Using Template10

Building a Universal Windows Platform (UWP) Application (Part 2) – T4 and Strings

If you haven’t already read the previous posts, I recommend you do since they all build on each other.

Today, we are going to discuss how we can add multilingual support to our application.

Read more: https://www.intertech.com/Blog/building-a-universal-windows-platform-uwp-application-part-3-multilingual-support/
Follow us: @IntertechInc on Twitter | Intertech on Facebook

 


uwppart2-560x224

I just rolled off a client recently that needed to build a Universal Windows Platform (UWP) application as part of their hardware and software solution.  For those who aren’t yet familiar with UWP, you can check out this article by Tyler Whitney.

As many of you developers out there are aware, sometimes you have to build or bring with you a number of application infrastructure items before you can even get started with the core application logic.  For example, you might need some helpers, services and base classes that make your job easier or allow you to start with your base patterns, such as, MVC, MVVM, etc.

So, I have decided to create a series of posts that build up a bunch of common, important parts of an application that you might want to have in place before you even start developing your core functionality. Check out the previous post about Using Template10. If you haven’t already read the previous post, I recommend you do since they all build on each other.

Today, we are going to discuss how we use strings in our application. Sounds easy doesn’t it? I mean, just type in your text like this, “Hello World!”, right? Well, not exactly.

Read more: https://www.intertech.com/Blog/building-a-universal-windows-platform-uwp-application-part-2-t4-and-strings/
Follow us: @IntertechInc on Twitter | Intertech on Facebook


Windows ShotsHey, welcome back to another Windows 10 Shots blog post.  I hope you read my last post, Windows 10 Tips – Snap Assist.

I have mentioned in previous posts, with most shots, after about a handful, things will start to get a little hazy.  But, with Windows 10 Shots, the hope would be that the opposite would happen.  That clarity and insight into the highly anticipated release would free your mind to great new features and power of Windows 10.

Microsoft just recently released their latest update for Windows 10, called Windows 10 Anniversary Update.  Oh, and this isn’t just a small update either.  It is a major update, with a lot of new features, performance enhancements, and bug fixes.

Read more: https://www.intertech.com/Blog/windows-10-tips-windows-taskbar-badges-anniversary-update/
Follow us: @IntertechInc on Twitter | Intertech on Facebook


Windows ShotsHey, welcome back to another Windows 10 tips blog post.  I hope you read my last post, Windows 10 Shots – Streaming and Cast to Device.

I have mentioned in previous posts, with most shots, after about a handful, things will start to get a little hazy.  But, with Windows 10 Shots (this new series of posts), the hope would be that the opposite would happen.  That clarity and insight into the highly anticipated release would free your mind to great new features and power of Windows 10.

Have you ever been in a meeting presenting, demo-ing or even pitching a great idea to your business, when a notification quickly pops up on your screen from a colleague or friend talking about the exciting bender the two of you are going to have later that night?   Suddenly, your face turns red and you frantically try to close the notification.  In some cases, you accidentally click the link in the notification and an inappropriate website/application comes up to display in all of its glory to all those participating in the meeting?  Well, hopefully that scenario, if it hasn’t already, will never happen to you.

With Windows 10, there are a couple of things that you can do to keep those pesky notifications from popping up on your screen during presentations or odd hours of the night.  (There is nothing like hearing your computer binging and bonging all night long with notifications.)

Read more: https://www.intertech.com/Blog/windows-10-tips-stop-those-notifications/
Follow us: @IntertechInc on Twitter | Intertech on Facebook


imageOverview

Hey everyone!  So, I have decided to start a new series on Silverlight.  I am calling it Silverlight Shots.  Silverlight Shots will be small blog posts that discuss a simple aspect/feature/thought about developing in Silverlight.  The goal is to keep the post small enough that you can read it and learn something in less than 3 minutes.  I will be starting from the very basics and then move into more advanced topics.  So, in order to keep with this goal … I better start now …

To start off with this series … we need to ask ourselves this question … what is Silverlight?  Sweet … easy answer … as defined by my Microsoft on their Silverlight home page, http://www.microsoft.com/silverlight/overview/default.aspx … stating this …

 

What is Silverlight?

Silverlight is a cross-browser, cross-platform and cross-device browser plug-in that helps companies design, develop and deliver applications and experiences on the Web. A free download that installs in seconds, Silverlight enables a new class of rich, secure and scalable cross-platform experiences.

Examples

If you want some great examples of sites using Silverlight … check out their showcase … http://silverlight.net/showcase/.  Very impressive!

Final thoughts …

Silverlight, though it seems like it is Microsoft’s version of Flash, if far more than that.  Can it do all the things that Flash can?  Yes, well mostly.  In my opinion, one of the most intriguing aspects of Silverlight is this … if you are already a .NET/Web developer … you are pretty much ready to start developing and deploying Silverlight applications.  You don’t have to learn a new language, a new development environment or setup new servers.  You simply do what you are good at … and that is develop!

Coming next …

In my next blog post … I will discuss how to quickly get up and running with with the Silverlight development environment!

Any comments?  I would love to hear them.  Comment on this blog or contact me on Facebook or Twitter … at http://facebook.com/edglogowski and  http://twitter.com/edyg023 respectively.


What are you talking about?  NUI?  Didn’t we start with UI (user interface) then move to GUI (graphical user interface) and then move to UX (user experience) as the focus for creating interfaces for software and web development?  So, now there is another … NUI!

What is NUI?  Natural User Interface.  Huh?  Well … with the popularity of the iPhone, Windows 7, Windows Mobile 6.5, and many other mobile devices … and soon to be released, Q1 of 2010, Windows Mobile 7 … touch screen technology is starting to catch the eye of most consumers.  In fact, one could argue that touch technologies are going to the interface of choice for a lot of high level consumer users.  Simple interfaces that allow for simple finger/hand gestures.

However, there are issues with today’s current GUI’s. http://10gui.com/ attempts, thru a video, to explain the issues that we have with current GUI’s and put into perspective a different way to look at design of NUI’s as the next movement for user interaction and experience.

Below is a snapshot of a NUI design.  Doesn’t look much different than any other UI … but, notice the 5 small circles with + signs in them.  Those are actual finger inputs from the right hand of the user.  The video will explain this more, but you can see with the ability to use more than one input point, various hand gestures will be able to perform more intuitive input to an application/web site then ever before.

image

Below is the video that I mentioned above.  Listen carefully to the current issues and see how using a gesture based UI can transform the experience of the user with the application.

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=6712657&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=0&color=&fullscreen=1

10/GUI from C. Miller on Vimeo.

My final thoughts are more additions to the NUI that is described in the video.  Here are a couple of ideas that I think would really make this NUI shine.  Keep reading …

Multiple Groups in Application Space

I think that the grouping in the application space as mentioned above is very cool.  However, what if you could group your groupings?  What if you wanted all your photo editing software in one grouping … all your email sites and programs in another … and all your web surfing browser sessions in another?  What if you wanted to save these groups so that you could load them all again later?  If you look at the image above the video in this article, you can imagine being able to scroll up and down lists of groups.  What if you could drag or copy one application from one group into another?  What if you could file applications or files into groups?  This would be very intuitive for the user, as well as provide a means to organize your work, play, etc. into your application space … or as I would like to say, work space.

Infinite Workspace Map – For quick file/application searching

If the multiple groups were implemented … you would obviously be able to zoom in and out, as they showed in the video, of your application space, but that could take some time if you are not aware or don’t remember where your file and/or application are in the groups.  So, it would be really nice if you could popup a transparent map that allows you to quickly navigate your application space without having to zoom in and out with a lot of finger/hand gestures.   Maybe you could implement a search box, similar to Spotlight on the MAC or the quick search on Windows, that would highlight the search results in the map.

Programmable Custom Gestures

What if you could create custom gestures which would load applications, search for files, perform maintenance tasks, call friends, etc.  The ability for you to create your own custom gestures or collections of gestures would allow you to get tasks done quickly without having to only be limited to the predefined basic gestures of the system.  Maybe you would turn on a record gesture(s) mode that would record your gestures and allow you to attach a text/video/audio/gesture help feature to help you remember the gesture and maybe playback the gesture for you in case you forget how to use it.

Automatic and Custom Lists

This is a minor addition to the already existing feature set that is in a lot of mobile applications.  The ability for the system to remember your last input (text, application choices, file destinations, etc.) and provide them in quick lists that would popup instantly or with a gesture.  This would allow for instant input into fields or other application actions.

In any case, you can see how important NUI design is going to be to software and the web.  I would love to hear any feedback you might have on this topic here on my blog or via Facebook or Twitter … usernames for them are Edyg023.